Fragile Oasis

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Projects: Research

Project Snoopy

A team of amateur astronomers are hoping to team up with scientists at the University of Glamorgan to search the sky for a piece of the Apollo 10 Lunar Module that's been orbiting the Sun since 1969.

Following a successful summer of asteroid hunting, a team of amateur astronomers are hoping to team up with scientists at the University of Glamorgan to search the sky for space debris, but this time it is a distinctly man-made object they are after – the Apollo 10 Lunar Module ascent stage.

The late 1960’s saw the most ambitious and incredible achievement in the history of mankind, culminating with the landing of Apollo 11 on the Moon. The practice run for this, Apollo 10, launched in May 1969, and aimed to carry out all the stages of the Apollo 11 mission except the lunar landing. Apollo 10 still holds the record for the fastest human beings have ever flown; along with the distance record for the farthest mankind has ever been from the Earth.

Once it had completed its historic mission, the Lunar Module ascent stage, known as “Snoopy” (named after the famous “Peanuts” cartoon character), was sent off in an orbit around the Sun - and 42 years later, it’s still out there somewhere, travelling through space.

Now, the Faulkes Telescope team at the University of Glamorgan will be working with UK amateur astronomer Nick Howes, along with Ernesto Guido and Giovanni Sostero of the Remanzacco Observatory in Italy, to attempt what could be an almost impossible task - finding Snoopy. And this time, they are inviting schools to hel