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http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/record-loss-of-arctic-sea-ice-causing-big-ecosystem-changes-study-1.1156941 behold; the effects of ignoring our responsibilities to natural systems

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Glad to see these ideas getting traction in serious discussion that could result in global initiative: "... The perhaps best-known positive feedback mechanism is the so-called ice-albedo feedback. In a warmer world there will be less snow and sea ice. Their melting reveals the darker land and water surfaces below, which absorb more solar heat. More absorption then causes yet more melting and warming, and so forth, in a self-reinforcing feedback loop. The unprecedented thawing of 97% of Greenland’s surface ice in July 2012, for example, has led to a darkening of Greenland’s ice cap, meaning that it will begin to absorb higher levels of solar energy and melt faster still. Melting of the complete Arctic summer sea ice – the Arctic is expected to be seasonally ice-free by around 2040 – could probably be reversed on human timescales if greenhouse gases are reduced and temperature drops." ... ~Except from the 2013 World Economic Forum > Report Home > Global Risks > X Factors via The more water is free the more easily can the natural systems of the Earth absorb and adapt to human activity. We are removing tons of essential elements from Earths natural cooling and regenerative cycles for mostly cosmetic purposes at this point in time... but we might still be able to exercise better decision making and turn the trends around with better data collection and a more contemplative and aware model of usage and distribution. More on WEF X Factors our future may be facing can be found here; http://reports.weforum.org/global-risks-2013/view/section-five/x-factors/#hide/fn-9

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D.M.J. M. in response to D.M.J. M.

another 2 weeks, still not fixed. assurances mooted. oh well. http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?db=comics&id=2902

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WATERWARS2035; an interesting look at how both poverty and overt military suppression tactics include poor access to water and possible future trends where water (or lack thereof) can be used as a weapon. Global water stewardship for the benefit of all mankind was never more important. Interesting examples in Israeli areas of conflict, etc. http://stream.aljazeera.com/story/201304250019-0022703?utm_content=automate&utm_campaign=Trial6&utm_source=NewSocialFlow&utm_term=plustweets&utm_medium=MasterAccount

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sacred water awareness http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/2013/05/07/green-up-column-dont-take-water-for-granted

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This is a very interesting perspective of bottled water. We often don't think about the water "trapped" in bottles and removed from the natural hydrological cycle, but maybe there's a reason for that. I decided to do some rough math to figure out how much water is actually "trapped". Mind you, I'm not getting too deep into this, so I used Wikipedia and the like. Yes, this is VERY rough. Ok, so bottled water is a business. I figure the bottling companies have it figured out to pretty much match supply and demand. Wikipedia says 115 million cubic meters of bottled water were consumed globally in 2006. Let's assume that number holds to today. I'm assuming 115 million cubic meters per year is the rate that bottling companies are "trapping" water. All we need now is the residence time that water spends in bottles. Mind you, this is VERY rough, but relianceproducts.com estimates the average shelf life of a bottle of water at 2 years. I'm assuming after this time, water is consumed (drunk, turned into urine, and flushed, thus returned to the natural hydrological cycle), or "disposed of" (poured down a drain, thus returned to nature). So, 2 years times 115 million cubic meters per year means 230 million cubic meters (61 billion gallons, or 230 billion liters) is currently trapped in water bottles. That sounds like a lot, but it only accounts for 0.00000002% of Earth's water, and 0.0000006% of Earth's freshwater. It's true that bottling water has had very detrimental effects on water sources in many locales, but I doubt very much that it affects our water supply locally. Bottling water definitely does not affect the sea level. I like any project that gets people to think about where our water is, but what I really don't like about this particular project is that it promotes giving money to one of the most environmentally sinister industries in the world (bottled water companies). It would be different if you were stealing the water, but I suppose this isn't the venue for promoting illegal activity ;)

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Mike S. in response to Mike S.

sorry, typ-o, I meant I don't think it affects our water supply globally

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D.M.J. M. in response to Mike S.

thank you for your intelligent and considerate posts :) the info I have found is close to yours but these numbers totally discount the water industry in say china, india ... moreover total freshwater and available fresh water are two different things. As you sai it is often detrimental to the locales where the bottling takes place, and its taking place in more places than you might think I would argue. Cumulatively with all bottled beverage industries, all bottled water and all pools, and other cosmetic and commercial uses would bump your initial numbers up. Also much bottled water is stored away from commercial circles entirely (emergency relief rations for example which are stockpiled) I also found most of the numbers that come out are heavily mitigated by the fact that they are produced by a self-regulating industry. Where I live all the tertiary schools have outlawed the stuff from campus' so there's something going on. I have been working on a much more comprehensive video outlining all the research and information I've accumulated since starting this project. I think most people would be surprised to learn the true nature of the bottled water industry, its effects on ecosystems and how little is really known about the cumulative effects of this whole thing. When lakes and rivers all over are at record low levels I cannot help but think that all the water we trap away in production cycles is at least a part of the problem... and more than the 0.0000006% you suggested... a big part of this is just to get people thinking about it, water is sacred, a human right and essential and finite... we need to take care ;) Thanks again and aye, I thought about just stealing water from the lake and dumping it back... but then, you know, all moot :D Sucks to have to support the industry to try and undo some of its harmful effects, but there's no other way to liberate it... To me that's kind of like saying "all the hostages die because we wont negotiate with terrorizers" ... if you want to save them you'll have to stoop down there for a little dialogue, unfortunately ;) (I would also advocate buying it on sale for the purposes of 'the dumping' sometimes you can get as many as 24 500ml bottles for like $2 around here... its only two bucks... what else have we done for the planet today ;) Cheers !

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Water in 2050 and effects on GDP ... nice perspective. http://growingblue.com/water-in-2050/

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I guess if we make a solid plan to mine H20 from the moon or an asteriod my project is bust... but I'd settle for that too I spose... beats buying *generic*. AquaLuna ?

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